Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Connecting the Community: Holiday Toy Drive
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

The Story of a Life

The Story of a Life

posted by:
November 19, 2013 - 6:00am

Cover art for SomeoneNational Book Award winner and three-time Pulitzer Prize finalist Alice McDermott’s first novel in seven years was definitely worth the wait. Someone is a thoughtful and heartbreaking look at one extraordinarily ordinary woman. Marie is first introduced to readers as a child of the 1930s, living amongst the Irish-American population of Brooklyn, awaiting the return of her beloved father from work. In this simple sketch, McDermott is able to immediately detail Marie’s community and family. In a non-linear framework, the stories which make Marie’s life are slowly pieced together much like mosaics in a stained glass window.

 

Marie lives with her brother Gabe and their parents in a Brooklyn brownstone. Gabe is destined for the seminary and Marie is hoping for a life as a wife and mother. Her only worry is that she will end up alone because of her plainness and quiet nature. Marie’s keen observations and vulnerability reveal the internal life of a fascinating woman. From her brother’s eventual loss of faith to her first heartbreak, from her parents’ deaths to the changing nature of her neighborhood, the reader is invited to experience with Marie the impact everyday events have on a life.

 

Someone was one of 10 titles selected by five judges for this year’s National Book Award long list. This marks another major achievement for one of this country’s finest writers. In McDermott’s hands, this seemingly innocuous and unimportant woman’s life is drawn as a powerful portrait highlighting the fact that each of us has a story to share. This remarkable book is a beautifully written celebration of family, community and history. Readers will long remember and cherish this heartfelt tale which quietly encourages self-reflection, understanding and empathy.

Maureen

categories:

 
 

Are You Afraid of the Dark?

Cover art for Yeti, Turn Our the Light!Who could be afraid of some cute little bunnies, birdies and a deer? Well, when they are making strange noises and shadows at night they could frighten anyone, even a big furry Yeti. Authors Greg Long and Chris Edmundson and illustrator Wednesday Kirwan creatively address the common childhood issue of being afraid of the dark in Yeti, Turn Out the Light! As the day comes to an end, Yeti returns home from the forest and gets ready for bed. He gets cozy under the covers and turns out the lights. Even though Yeti is tired, he can’t seem to fall asleep because of the frightening shadows in his room. Is it a monster coming to get him? No! It’s just some of his woodland friends who have joined him for an impromptu sleepover.  Bright illustrations and rhyming text make this an excellent book to share with your little one.
 

To further help your child explore their fear of the dark at bedtime, try Let’s Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy by Jan Thomas. Using bright, cartoon-like illustrations, Thomas shows how a brave cowboy’s imagination gets the best of him as he tries to sing the cows to sleep. Children may also like I Want My Light On!: A Little Princess Story by Tony Ross. When the little princess goes to bed, she insists that the light be left on because she believes there are ghosts in the dark. As it turns out, little ghosts are just as afraid of the dark.
 

Christina

 
 

Barbara Park, 1947-2013

Barbara Park, 1947-2013

posted by:
November 18, 2013 - 10:36am

Cover art for Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusBarbara Park, bestselling author of the beloved Junie B. Jones series, among other children’s books, passed away on Friday at the age of 66 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. The series Park was best known for followed the irrepressible Junie B. and her kindergarten (and later first grade) classmates as they encountered everyday situations that vex the average 5- or 6-year-old. Starting with Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, these books have entertained countless first-time readers. Aside from activity books and other related Junie B. material, Park published 28 Junie B. Jones titles.

 

Beyond Junie B., Park also excelled at writing other children’s books. Two of her best-known have been contemporary classics since their publication. Skinnybones follows the smallest kid on his baseball team who unfortunately also has the biggest mouth. For older kids, the tragic story Mick Harte Was Here covers the aftermath of a sister coping with the biking death of her brother. Acclaimed author Judy Blume was among the many who, over the weekend, spoke about Park’s enduring legacy, stating that some of Junie B.’s admirers confused the two: "I'd always say, 'I didn't write them, but I wish I had."

Todd

 
 

Fresh from the Oven

Fresh from the Oven

posted by:
November 18, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Bake It, Don't Fake ItCover art for The Holiday Kosher BakerCover art for Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a DayWith a chill in the air and the holidays right around the corner, now is the perfect time to experiment with recipes from these new cookbooks. Heather Bertinetti’s Bake It, Don't Fake It!: A Pastry Chef Shares Her Secrets for Impressive (and Easy) From-Scratch Desserts is the go-to guide for those of us who want to impress family and friends with tasty desserts made from scratch. With recipes like Raspberry Almond Tart with Chantilly Cream, Dulce de Leche Cheesecake, Chocolate Hazelnut Cake, Bourbon-Chocolate Pecan Pie and Red Velvet Macarons, Bertinetti’s desserts will dazzle your family and friends, but her foolproof tips and techniques make them accessible for even less-experienced bakers. This book is filled with mouthwatering recipes and plenty of color photos to make it easy for you to create these tempting treats. It includes a foreword by TV personality and Food Network star Rachael Ray, and it is part of Ray’s new line of cookbooks published by Atria Books.

 

Paula Shoyer brings together a year of holiday baking in The Holiday Kosher Baker: Traditional & Contemporary Holiday Desserts. Arranged into sections for each holiday, the recipes vary from easy to challenging. Shoyer presents a mix of traditional and modern recipes that exhibit her unique flair. You’ll be tempted to serve her elegant Raspberry and Rose Macaron Cake, stunning Ombre Layer Cake or whimsical Tie-dyed Mini Black and White Cookies at your own family gatherings. Shoyer has appeared on the Food Network’s Sweet Genius and is a frequent magazine contributor. She lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

 

Who doesn’t love the smell of bread baking on a chilly day? The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery that Revolutionizes Home Baking by Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois is a revised and updated version of their runaway bestseller. Their secret is that the dough is made ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Hertzberg and Francois prove that even inexperienced bakers can make bread at home without kneading or special equipment. This new edition includes step-by-step photos, 30 more recipes and a chapter of gluten-free breads.
 

Beth

categories:

 
 

A Family Affair

A Family Affair

posted by:
November 15, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for After HerThe Beltway Sniper. The Green River Killer. The Boston Strangler. Great unease prevails in a community when there is a cold-blooded killer on the loose. Police work tirelessly and civilians are extra cautious about venturing out. But what happens when the investigation drags on without anyone being apprehended and the number of victims continues to climb? This is the story in Joyce Maynard’s latest book, After Her, a novel as much about a serial killer as it is about the complicated relationships between parents, children and siblings. When sisters Rachel and Patty are teenagers, women begin turning up dead in the mountainous area just beyond their home in northern California. The killer, dubbed the “Sunset Strangler” because of his method and time of day he kills his victims, always seems to be one step ahead of law enforcement. The sisters’ father is the local detective assigned to solve the case, and his spirits and physical health decline as the killer continues to elude capture. Eventually, public opinion turns against him, and he is removed from the case, leaving an unfinished chapter in his career. Thirty years later, his daughter Rachel is still trying to make sense —  and make peace — with her now-deceased father’s professional and personal struggles.   

 

Maynard crafts a story that is family saga, history lesson and murder mystery melded together. There is suspense, but also poignant moments showcasing the lasting bonds of family. Ultimately, in order to find the missing piece of the puzzle, Rachel must confront unexpected secrets of her father’s past. Maynard based After Her on the real-life case of the Trailside Killer, and the investigating detective and his family. On her website you can watch a trailer for the book with interviews with the real-life sisters behind the story.

 

Melanie

 
 

A Few Good Men

A Few Good Men

posted by:
November 14, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Hard As It GetsMaryland romance author Laura Kaye is launching her new Hard Ink series this month with Hard As It Gets. Becca Merritt is desperate. Her brother Charlie is missing. Before he disappeared, Charlie sent her a message that said, “Find Rixey, the Colonel’s team, Hard Ink Tattoo.” With no other options, Becca goes to Hard Ink Tattoo and finds Nick Rixey, a former member of her father’s Special Forces team. Nick has no interest in helping the Merritt family. After Colonel Merritt betrayed Nick’s team, they were ambushed, and the survivors’ military careers were destroyed. Despite his feelings about Becca’s family, Nick decides to start checking up on her. He gets drawn into the intrigue when he saves her from an intruder who breaks into her house. Soon, Nick is working with Becca and reassembling his old team to help her find Charlie and save him from an organized crime ring.

 

Set in Baltimore, Hard As It Gets is a strong start to Kaye’s gritty new romantic suspense series, which will continue to follow the men of Hard Ink as they uncover the truth about the incident that destroyed their military careers.  Filled with plenty of action and some steamy love scenes, this series and the hard-edged men of Hard Ink will appeal to readers who like Maya Banks’ KGI series or Julie Ann Walker’s Black Knights Inc. novels.

 

Earlier this year, Kaye’s unlikely path to writing romance novels was the subject of a fascinating Huffington Post article. After sustaining a traumatic brain injury from an everyday accident, Kaye developed Post Concussion Syndrome. She began experiencing behavioral changes, one of which was newfound creative ability. Though she had never written fiction before, she wrote a 450 page novel in only 11 weeks! Kaye’s unlikely injury was a twist of fate that led her to this unexpected new career.
 

Beth

categories:

 
 

Dutch Invasion

Dutch Invasion

posted by:
November 14, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Girl With a Pearl EarringCover art for The GoldfinchLiterary fans of something old and something new now have an opportunity to see, in person, the art masterpieces at the heart of two respected writers' novels. Tracy Chevalier's hugely successful Girl with a Pearl Earring and Donna Tartt's eagerly anticipated new novel, The Goldfinch, feature paintings by Dutch masters now on temporary display in the United States. Johannes Vermeer's beloved "Girl with a Pearl Earring" and Carel Fabritius's exquisite "Goldfinch" are currently part of a 15-painting exhibition on loan to the Frick Collection in New York until January 19.  

 

Girl with the Pearl Earring, Chevalier's second novel, is about Vermeer's 16-year-old housemaid who becomes the subject of his painting. It was greeted with popular and critical success following its publication in 1999. In addition to some 4 million copies sold, the book was turned into a movie.

 

The Goldfinch, Donna Tartt's sweeping new novel, is part suspense thriller, part coming-of-age novel. It centers on a young man named Theo, whose life is changed forever following a bomb attack at a New York museum that leaves his mother dead and him in possession of a rare Fabritius painting.

 

Now at the final American venue of a global tour, the paintings are traveling for only the second time in 30 years as the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in The Hague undergoes an extensive two-year renovation. Here is your opportunity to get up close and personal with the paintings behind the stories. Visit the Frick Collection for more information.
 

Cynthia

 
 

FBI Teen Task Force

FBI Teen Task Force

posted by:
November 13, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for The NaturalsJennifer Lynn Barnes, author of the Raised by Wolves series, has a newly released book, The Naturals. This novel is the first installment in a new Young Adult series. Barnes has a penchant for writing in the paranormal genre, but The Naturals is borderline realistic crime fiction.

 

Cassandra Hobbes is a “Natural,” even if she doesn’t know it yet. When she was very young, her mother Lorelai claimed that she was a psychic, when really she just profiled people based on small details she could glean from their appearance and comportment. Lorelai taught her daughter the tricks to profiling people so that she could help with her mother’s act. It is this ability to read people that sets Cassie apart.

 

After Lorelai’s disappearance and presumed death, Cassie had to move in with her grandmother because her father was serving in the military oversees.  Cassie has never felt like she fits in with her family, so when she is confronted by an FBI agent who asks her to move to Washington D.C. and join a special team of talented teens, she jumps at the opportunity. The eclectic group of gifted teens is brought together under one roof where they can hone their skills and help the FBI by working on cold cases.

 

The Naturals is equal parts Shadowlands by Kate Brian and the television series Criminal Minds, with interactions that are reminiscent of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series. The crime, action and sometimes gruesome depictions of murder scenes will take the reader on a wild ride, while the character development and smattering of romance will help to ease the tension.
 

Randalee

 
 

Girls of Atomic City

Girls of Atomic City

posted by:
November 13, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for The Girls of Atomic CityBy 1942, the United States government had fully committed to the idea of building an atomic bomb. The scope of that project would dwarf any other single undertaking in human history in cost and material. The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan details the experiences of 16 women who find themselves wrapped up in the secrecy and inadvertent social engineering of the Manhattan Project.

 

Oak Ridge, Tennessee was the first of the three biggest Manhattan project facilities and did not exist until the Department of Defense built it. For years, it didn’t even appear on any maps. The town started small, but as the project ramped up there was an increased need for housing, stores, sundries and recreational outlets. By the end of World War II, 75,000 lived in and around Oak Ridge. With so many able-bodied men in the military, women formed a vital backbone to the efforts at Oak Ridge. Some were transported in from the coasts without knowledge of their final destination. Others were from the surrounding area, lured in by the promise of well-paying, if secretive, government work. There were also the women scientists involved in the research, although they were often deprived of the accolades. Many of these women had never been away from home; many had never earned their own salary before. They found themselves someplace where the security and secrecy was oppressive. Some were even recruited to spy on their fellow workers.  

 

Kiernan lets the women tell their own stories, and if many of them are similar, the cross-section is still broad. Especially interesting is the vast difference in experiences based on race, the United States still viciously segregated at the time. It’s also interesting to see how this group of clever young people made a dry county one of the best areas for the production and smuggling of moonshine in the U.S. Many of the women Kiernan interviewed were shocked at the war’s end to realize what exactly they had been working on. Most of them, though, remained in Oak Ridge - at least the town if not the facility.

Brian

 
 

A True Champ

Cover art for Strength of a ChampionO.J. Brigance knows what it’s like to be a winner on and off the field. He had a remarkable career as an NFL linebacker, including as a member of the 2000 Baltimore Ravens’ Super Bowl winning team. Following that victory, Brigance joined the front office to help create more championship teams for the purple and black. But in 2007, he was diagnosed with ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and his life was forever altered. Peter Schrager, FoxSports.com senior writer, and Brigance share his inspirational story of perseverance and hope in Strength of a Champion: Finding Faith and Fortitude Through Adversity.

 

Upon diagnosis, doctors told Brigance he would have three to five years to live, years which would be marked by the loss of speech and mobility. But Brigance, familiar with hits on the field, refused to give up.  Rather than follow a path of self-pity, Brigance viewed his diagnosis as an opportunity. With faith, determination and the love of his wife Chanda, O.J. fought back and raised awareness for this debilitating disease. No longer able to walk or speak, Brigance remained a vibrant presence in Baltimore’s front office and touched everyone in the organization as the team claimed another Super Bowl victory in 2013.

 

Brigance received motivation and energy from the team as well, and shared special bonds with players and coaches. Upon hearing of Ray Lewis’ retirement, Brigance told him to go out a champion. And when illness threatened his appearance at the Super Bowl, he recovered and delivered a moving pre-game message to the team. At the conclusion of Brigance’s powerful speech, Coach John Harbaugh had no doubt that the Super Bowl would be Baltimore’s. Brigance shares wonderful behind-the-scenes stories and humorous anecdotes which will appeal to ardent football fans, but this story of one courageous man living a life of inspiration and faith transcends the football field. Learn more about The Brigance Brigade, O.J.’s foundation dedicated to equipping, encouraging, and empowering people living with ALS.
 

Maureen