Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Personalized help is waiting for you with My Librarian.
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

What price would you pay?

Cover art for Dead SetNew York Times bestselling author Richard Kadrey delights adults and teens alike with Dead Set. After the unexpected death of her father, Zoe and her mother must move to the Tenderloin area of San Francisco while they wait for dividends from her father’s life insurance policy. To deal with her troubles in the real world, Zoe escapes into her dreams where she finds comfort and friendship from her dream brother, Valentine. A mysterious something — or someone — has also joined them in her dream world.

 

Back in the real world, Zoe happens upon a dark and dingy old record store. Most people walk right past the back room with the beaded curtain, but Zoe is curious and goes inside. There she discovers a collection of albums that contain something other than music. The grooves on these records contain lives — souls of people who have passed on but lingered in this world. Emmett, the proprietor of the record store, promises to help Zoe reconnect with her father. All it would cost her is a piece of herself. It starts with a lock of her hair.  The next time, the price is a tooth. How much would you pay to spend another moment with someone you loved and lost? And at what point does the price become too much?

 

Kadrey is best known for his Sandman Slim series. This dark, twisted, stand-alone fantasy novel will appeal to those already familiar with his work as well as those who enjoy a quiet horror story with a strong, albeit sometimes lost, female character.

Christina

 
 

Beyond Darkness... Beyond Desolation

Cover art for The Hobbit Movie GuideCover art for The Hobbit Visual CompanionCover art for The Hobbit Art and DesignHobbit fans rejoice! The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug premiered in Los Angeles on December 2, and will be opening nationwide on December 13. This grand fantasy was co-written, produced and directed by Peter Jackson and is the second installment of a planned trilogy based on J. R. R. Tolkein’s novel, The Hobbit. The storyline follows the events of last year’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Stephen Fry and Orlando Bloom are just a few of the featured stars. An epic film demands companion guides, and fans of the series and movie buffs alike will enjoy the following sumptuous titles.

 

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Official Movie Guide is a behind-the-scenes guide to the making of the film, and features interviews with key cast and crew. Enjoy exclusive interviews with Peter Jackson and other filmmakers who share production insights. The rich illustrations take readers deeper into the world of Bilbo Baggins with an abundance of photos of the actors, creatures, costumes and special effects.

 

 
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Visual Companion offers background into the world of Middle Earth, and includes character profiles and notes on various landmarks. This lavishly illustrated companion follows The Company of Thorin Oakenshield as they embark on a dangerous journey to Erebor, where the dragon Smaug awaits. Introduced by Richard Armitage, who plays Thorin Oakenshield, and complemented with beautiful illustrations, the Visual Companion offers an impeccable narrative of the Company’s passage to Erebor.

 

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Chronicles: Art & Design celebrates the creative vision behind this movie. Readers will enjoy the unrestrained exploration into the design and development of the environments, cultures, creatures and artifacts encountered by the characters during their epic journey. Filled with hundreds of images, including conceptual art and supplementary photographs, the comprehensive commentary provided by the film’s cast and crew is enlightening and informative.
 

Maureen

 
 

Style Watch

Style Watch

posted by:
December 12, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Style and the Successful GirlCover art for Cheap Chica's Guide to StyleWant to dress for success? Confused by your closet? Two new titles from fashion experts will solve all your design dilemmas, including just what in the world to wear to that holiday party!

 

Gretta Monahan, Rachael Ray’s style guru, successfully tackles universal style questions with accessible answers in Style and the Successful Girl: Transform Your Look, Transform Your Life. A graduate of Harvard Business School, Monahan has built a multi-million dollar fashion and beauty empire that includes swanky boutiques and spas. Her chic approach is embraced by Hollywood A-listers, but also works for the average woman of any age and any style. The lessons, tips and transformations are beautifully presented in this exceptionally illustrated guide that is guaranteed to help women achieve a fun and functional wardrobe without losing personal flair. From head to toe, readers will come away with makeover suggestions which will also serve to empower and attract success.

 
America’s favorite frugal fashionista, Lilliana Vazquez, has been providing tips and tricks since 2008 on the popular CheapChicas.com. Now, Vazquez offers her advice on shopping smart in The Cheap Chica’s Guide to Style.  With hundreds of appearances on national shows where she shares her thrifty point of view, Vazquez is a recognized style savant. In her fun guide, she approaches fashion from a practical point of view. Light quizzes help readers determine their style and budget. Once those critical elements are defined, readers can take Vazquez’s advice on creating individual panache, copying designer favorites and finding the best places to shop. One quick pointer: your own closet is a super source of bargain shopping! This attractive volume is an indispensable accessory for the New Year.
 

Maureen

 
 

Dino-mite!

Dino-mite!

posted by:
December 11, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Scaly Spotted Feathered Frilled Cover art for Tracking TyranosaursCover art for The Greatest Dinosaur EverThree new books take on the perennial favorite topic of dinosaurs, but with new information being discovered all the time, adults as well as kids will find themselves learning – or relearning – about these fascinating creatures from the past.  

 

Scaly Spotted Feathered Frilled: How Do We Know What Dinosaurs Really Looked Like? by Catherine Thimmesh focuses on the new developments in paleontology with regard to the outward appearance of dinosaurs. She teams with a group of six acclaimed paleoartists who have worked with museums, movie studios and magazines to properly depict dinosaurs based on the latest research. This includes the discoveries made in the past two decades of the existence of feathers on many dinosaurs. The author, a Sibert medalist, explains in kid-friendly terminology how scientists have come to current conclusions, and how each future discovery could change their minds.

 

In Tracking Tyrannosaurs: Meet T. rex’s Fascinating Family, from Tiny Terrors to Feathered Giants, Christopher Sloan discusses the many other tyrannosaurs that lived in the Mesozoic Era among their more well-known cousin Tyrannosaurus rex. This National Geographic production features the publisher’s usual excellent art. Graphs and timelines help explain when each of these tyrannosaurs lived, and sidebars discuss the theories that paleontologists have regarding their close relationship to the birds of today. Particularly clear is the explanation of the simultaneous eras of the dinosaurs and the breakup of supercontinent Pangaea resulting in the continents that now exist.

 

For younger readers deciding on a favorite, The Greatest Dinosaur Ever by Brenda Z. Guiberson contains many options. Gennady Spirin’s double-page oil paint on paper illustrations are in soft but clear colors. Each dinosaur explains the reasons (huge claws, best parent, club-like tail, etc.) as to why it is the greatest dinosaur ever. Sure to spark debate among dino-loving youngsters, there is really no right or wrong selection. The author also focuses on a number of bird-like dinosaurs, again showing the relationship between the “terrible lizards” of long ago and the feathered creatures of today.

Todd

 
 

Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight

Cover art for The Maid's VersionOn a peaceful summer evening in the town of West Table, Missouri, the quiet of the night was shattered by a thunderous explosion. In 1929, the Arbor Dance Hall blew apart with a force that flattened the two story buildings adjacent to it, with a blast that was felt in the next town some 20 miles away. Forty-two people lost their lives and countless others suffered terrible injuries from either the fire or having been blown from the building. The devastation wrought by the dance hall explosion had an impact on every resident of the town. Daniel Woodrell’s new novel The Maid’s Version recounts many of their stories.  

 

The mystery of what caused the explosion and who was responsible was never discovered. Could it have been mob related? Was it the evil deed of a band of Gypsies? Was it just a tragic accident or possibly something more ominous the town leaders wanted covered up? This literary novel is comprised of numerous small chapters, frequently describing the circumstances of individuals who ended up at the dance that fateful Saturday night. Interspersed throughout the minor character vignettes is the story of Alma DeGeer Dunahew, a woman who believes she knows the truth.

 

This remarkable tale is a fictionalized account of an event that occurred on April 13, 1928 in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri. Woodrell believably captures the historical and cultural characteristics of the inhabitants of the Ozarks. It is the author’s skillful narration that will mesmerize the reader and bind them to this powerful yet tragic tale.

Jeanne

 
 

Here There Be Monsters

Monster on the HillIn an alternate Victorian-era England, all towns have a resident monster whose job is to scare and thrill the residents, as well as to protect them. Stoker-on-Avon has a problem: their monster is suffering from depression and a general lack of confidence. Much to the townsfolk’s dismay, Rayburn hasn’t attacked in well over a year and a half. Rob Harrell’s graphic novel Monster on the Hill chronicles the efforts of Charles Wilkie, doctor and inventor, who has been dispatched by the town fathers to “fix the monster.” Timothy, the self-proclaimed town crier/street urchin, stows away in the doctor’s trunk in order to be a part of the mission.

 

Rayburn, a heavy-lidded, horned, winged, rust-colored creature, boasts no special skills or talents. He doesn’t breathe fire and he can’t fly. After diagnosing his problem, Wilkie suggests a restorative road trip to visit other town monsters to pick up some “tricks of the trade.” His old school chum Noodles, better known as Tentaculor, may offer just the boost he needs. This edgy, drolly humorous graphic novel will capture the imagination of a wide range of readers, much like Jeff Smith’s popular Bone series.  Harrell captures a Victorian feel while sprinkling in modern anachronisms to good comic effect, as vendors hawk Tentaculor merchandise (like trading cards and Tentacu-Pops) after a recent attack. Older children who enjoy tales of adventure and dragons will enjoy the twist on the usual trope. Harrell’s wide-eyed villagers and thoroughly detailed monsters are enormously visually appealing, as is his choice of a bright, colorful palette.  Readers will eagerly await upcoming books in this ongoing, all-ages series.

Paula G.

 
 

To Leningrad, With Love

The Boy on the BridgeOh, the romanticism of falling in love abroad, even when the city is Soviet-era Leningrad in the 1980s. In Natalie Standiford’s new novel, The Boy on the Bridge, Laura is an eager college student who's had a love affair with Russia since childhood. Studying abroad in Leningrad, despite the hardships of the time, is just another way to immerse herself in the culture and language. During a chance encounter, Laura meets Alyosha, a mysterious young man who defies the profile of the typical Soviet youth. He questions his government, is scornful of the blind devotion Russians have towards their leaders and is fascinated by all things American, including Laura. Unfortunately, all of these qualities make him a target for the KGB, and Laura becomes increasingly afraid for Alyosha’s safety, especially as she falls in love with him. But in a time of strained American-Soviet relations, when many Russians dream of escaping to the West by any means possible, can she really trust Alyosha’s affections?

 

Beautifully written and peppered with details about Soviet food, culture, manners, housing and customs, The Boy on the Bridge transports readers to frozen Leningrad in all its authenticity. Standiford presents a unique and nuanced love story with realistic characters and an honest look at Soviet Russia with its many complexities and contradictions. Like her main character, she spent a college semester abroad in Leningrad, and photos and information on her website provide context and visuals for what is in the story. In a recent interview in Baltimore magazine, Standiford, a Baltimore native, also answers questions about how this story differs from her own study abroad experience and shares some information about her upcoming books.

Melanie

 
 

Mad about Bridget Jones

Mad about Bridget Jones

posted by:
December 5, 2013 - 6:00am

Bridget Jones: Mad about the BoyIt is a truth universally acknowledged that Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones is older in Mad about the Boy, but in many ways, she’s still the same old Bridget. Bridget Jones: Mad about the Boy, returns to Fielding’s beloved heroine, Bridget. Readers haven’t seen her since The Edge of Reason, which was published in 1999. Fielding revealed before the novel’s release that Mark Darcy, Bridget’s long-time love, had died five years before the new book begins. Now, in her fifties, Bridget is balancing children, social media and a new much younger boyfriend.

 

Longtime Bridget Jones fans will enjoy seeing their favorite characters pop up again in the latest novel. Bridget’s friends Tom and Jude make reappearances, and along with new friend Talitha, they help Bridget recover from the loss of Mark and look for love again. Daniel Cleaver, Bridget’s former boss and one-time love interest, returns as an emergency babysitter for Bridget, and while slightly more mature, seems to have changed very little since the earlier books. Bridget’s children, Billy and Mabel, bring a different sort of humor to the series, as do the parents and teachers at their school.

 

Bridget’s initial flirtations with 29-year-old Roxster via Twitter will remind readers of her days as a thirty-something looking for love in London. Now her romantic mishaps come in a new form as technology has changed, but Bridget still brings her unique brand of awkward to the situation. Told in Bridget’s diary format with the new addition of tweets and emails, readers will enjoy seeing her all grown up and dealing with new challenges, like motherhood, writing a screenplay and getting a second chance at love.

Laura

categories:

 
 

Gilded Age Intrigue

Gilded Age Intrigue

posted by:
December 4, 2013 - 6:00am

Fallen WomenIn the spring of 1885, New York socialite Beret Osmundsen is devastated to learn of the death of her estranged younger sister, Lillie. In Fallen Women by Sandra Dallas, Beret’s investigation into her sister’s death takes her from New York to Denver, from dazzling penthouses to seamy brothels.

 

Beret’s aunt and uncle share the news of Lillie’s death, but not the tragic details of her last days. Upon arriving in Denver, Beret learns that Lillie was working as a prostitute in a high-end brothel – the site of her murder. Beret is focused on tracking down Lillie’s murderer and avenging her sister’s death. She quickly encounters Detective Mick McCauley who is assigned to the case and looks to work with him in solving this tragedy. Mick, however, doesn’t need any assistance and initially tries to quell her involvement. But never underestimate the power of a sister’s love or the thirst for justice.

 

As Beret and Mick are forced together, they develop a mutual respect. Their growing bond will intrigue readers as the duo find themselves transported from the seedy tenderloin district to a high society peopled with the wealthiest and most influential. As she forges ahead in her determination to see the truth uncovered, Beret must deal with uncooperative and suspicious relatives, cope with the incivility of high society and come to terms with the fact that she never really knew her sister.  Complicating things further are another murder and a growing number of potential suspects. Dallas does an excellent job of recreating nineteenth century Denver, crafting a well-paced mystery and creating a promising chemistry between Mick and Beret, which will have readers looking forward to their next rendezvous.

Maureen

 
 

After Life

After Life

posted by:
December 3, 2013 - 6:00am

In the AfterImagine one day you are at home watching TV and the world just… collapses. You don’t know what has happened to anyone you know, you can’t get your parents or anyone on the phone. At one point, you even go through the phone book calling every number you can, hoping someone answers—they don’t. You hear shooting and screaming in the streets until eventually you hear nothing. Good thing your mom was a paranoid government official and surrounded your house with a huge electric fence that keeps out whatever it is that is out there. Good thing your dad was an environmental enthusiast who installed solar panels and a vegetable garden on your roof so you have power and a food source once the world goes dark. In Demitria Lunetta’s debut novel, In the After, 16-year-old Amy finds herself in this very situation.

 

Amy learns how to survive in her fortified home by eating the vegetables her father grew and rationing the remaining food in her fridge and pantry. She learns that whatever is prowling the streets retreats once the sun goes down and that as long as she remains completely quiet, she is safe. Eventually when her food begins to run out, she must venture out to scavenge. She walks to the nearby stores in her socks to stay as quiet as possible. One day she makes an unexpected and life-altering discovery, a baby girl sitting on the floor of the supermarket.

 

Amy’s world has changed and she doesn’t know why. When her home becomes threatened, she and the girl she named “Baby” embark on an escape that leads them only to more questions and less answers. Lunetta’s first novel, the first in a series, will appeal to readers of science fiction and dystopian worlds.

Courtney