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Between the Covers with Trevor Pryce

posted by: November 10, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Rainbow SerpentGet to know former Baltimore Raven Trevor Pryce, a man of many talents — including writing and producing — as he talks about his popular Kulipari series of books for kids, soon to be a Netflix animated series. Learn more about the Kulipari and this fantastical world on the Kulipari website. The third book in the series, Amphibian’s End, is out now, and Trevor shares his thoughts on writing, living in Maryland, upcoming projects and, of course, playing for the Ravens.

 

Between the Covers: The Kulipari trilogy is such a fun blend of adventure, magic, the natural world and animals. What inspired you to create this fantastical land? And why frogs versus scorpions?
Trevor Pryce: I grew up in the '80s, a fan of Star Wars, X-Men and Transformers. And I remember being so wrapped up in the stories and how deep they went. The worlds seemed real to me because of the depth of the ideas. That never left me. When I got older I also found myself drawn to studying different parts of the world and civilizations. I visited Australia once and have never forgotten the experience. Aboriginal culture was one that I latched onto because I love the art and their mystic ways.

 

I grew up in Florida, and frogs weren’t my favorite of nature’s offerings. However, poisonous frogs were fascinating. Their bright colors make them almost whimsical, yet they are actually the deadliest creatures on the planet. So I put the fun side and the strong side together to create the world of the Kulipari in my books.
    

Kulipari as a word actually translates into the word “poison” in an Aboriginal dialect. Bringing frogs to my version of the Outback was a lot to mix together, but readers love the books so it works well. I continue to play with Aboriginal themes such as the Rainbow Serpent, The Land and more.

 

Photo of Trevor Pryce (Wikipedia Commons)BTC: How does the battle for the Amphibilands compare to a Ravens-Steelers game?
TP: Funny. In a Ravens-Steelers game, we all shake hands afterwards and all of the players are cordial. In the battle for the Amphibilands, there’s no “Good game” afterward. There’s no mutual respect. There’s only a winner…and a loser. And the loser faces death. Wait…then maybe it is like a Ravens-Steelers game! [laughs]

 

BTC: The illustrations by acclaimed artist Sanford Greene do so much to support the storytelling and bring this magical place to life. Describe the process of working with an illustrator and how it impacts your own writing process.    
TP: There’s a secret I’ll let you in on. Kulipari was written as a movie first. So it was always meant to be told visually. I was acting as a director would. There were ideas and themes that I wanted the readers to not have to imagine — things that would be come back later in the story. So although I like the power of imagination, there were some parts I didn’t want the readers to make up themselves. Like the “Poison” found in the characters and them glowing because of it. There’s a very specific way that I saw that in my mind so I wanted the readers to see the same way. I think if you had read the Star Wars movie script and saw the description of Darth Vadar, in your mind I doubt what you saw would have matched what George Lucas brought to life.  
  

I also put a lot of work into the design of the characters. The Amphibilands was another point of emphasis. Sanford helped me envision everything. He’s an incredible artist and by the time we got to book three, I didn’t have to tell him much or give any direction at all.

 

BTC: Why kids’ books? How have your own children influenced your writing?
TP: Before I wrote Kulipari, I had written a drama for ABC television, submitted storied to the The New York Times, NBC.com and other Hollywood outlets. I kept coming back to my son, who is now 9 years old. He had TVs in our house on whenever he wanted to. So Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Ninjago, Marvel, etc.  A writer is usually a product of his influences and surroundings. And my son surrounded me with the things he loved. If my daughters ran the TVs in the house, I would have likely written my own version of Twilight.
    

With kids’ properties, they live on forever, if they’re good. There’s always new 10-, 11-, 12-year-olds. It’s the reason why Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles keeps being re-booted.

 

BTC: What were some of your favorite books when you were a child?    
TP: When I was a kid there was Batman, Star Wars and ShaZam and the rest. My favorite book as a kid was called The Hooples Horrible Holiday.

 

BTC: Congratulations on the trilogy becoming a Netflix series (arriving next year). How involved will you be in production? Do you have any other news you can share about the series?
TP: Thanks! The Netflix series is in production now. The first season is 13 episodes. Seven of them are done. It looks pretty fantastic. I serve as the creator and executive producer. I picked everything. The music, the designs and the story the way I wanted to tell it.  It’s a labor of love.

 

Right now I’m writing the the prequel story, The Hidingwar trilogy that tells the story of Darel’s father Apari, and the formation of the Amphibilands after Terra Australis and the Poison Scrolls. I’m really, really excited about that one. They will be live action movies in theaters around 2018.

 

BTC: What other books or projects do you have that we can look forward to?
TP: Kulipari: Battalions, the mobile game, is available now for IOS and Android. It’s a tower defense game in the vein of Clash of Clans or Game of War. It’s really, really cool. You can pick either Frogs or Scorpions and build your army. In the future, we are going to add Spiders and Turtles. And this month, the release of book three in the series Amphibian’s End!

    
Mattel has made a series of toys that go with the game that give in-game upgrades. Really, really cool. And Under Armour is making Kulipari Gear starting with limited edition T-shirts available now. Very limited quantities of course.
    
There’s going to be a fourth book in the series called Kulipari: A Lord Rises, which picks up after Amphibian’s End. Burnu is also getting a comic book called Kulipari: Heritage, as he’s the Kulipari version of Wolverine and will set out on his own adventure.
    
Also be on the lookout for Kulipari: Dreamwalker on Xbox One and PS4 next fall.

 

BTC: You were such an important part of the Ravens’ number 1 ranked defense. Can you share some of your favorite moments or games during your time as a member of Ravens Nation with our readers? How do Baltimore fans rank compared to fans from other cities you played in?
TP: I think the biggest thing I can share about that was the fact that my family and I decided to stay in this area. We live in Howard County and love it here. My kids were all born in Denver and, if not for playing for the Ravens, we would still be living there. And although Denver is great, it isn’t the DMV [D.C./Maryland/Virginia area]. And we are so grateful that a place like this exists. Everything about it.
    

So I would say I have the Ravens to thank for that. We would have never looked at Baltimore as a viable place to raise our children and set roots if not for me playing here. It’s a great organization, yes, but it’s even better as a part of the country. I’ve told everyone I know that they should move here.
    

Really, at the end of the day, I played for three cities, and my biggest compliment is that when football is over, where do the players go when they retire? I went here. I stayed here. I didn’t stay in this part of the world because it was just the last place where I played. I stayed because I love it. And there’s no better thing I can say than that. Really. And that’s my favorite memory. Because every day it keeps giving.


 
 

The Taming of the Queen

posted by: November 9, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Taming of the Queen“Divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived” is an old mnemonic device for remembering the order and fates of Henry VIII’s six wives. In The Taming of the Queen by Philippa Gregory, the reader meets the wife that survived, Kateryn Parr. Written in first person from Kateryn’s point of view, the story delves into the many trials that she endures as a wife and queen. When the 31-year-old Kateryn marries 52-year-old Henry in 1543 to become his sixth wife, she has been twice widowed, and all of her marriages have been arranged. Before Henry proposes, Kateryn is set to marry Thomas Seymour, the man she actually loves. However, no one dares go against the tyrannical Henry, so Kateryn puts her love aside to marry the king.

 

At first, Henry dotes on Kateryn, buying her expensive presents and exotic birds from all over the world to fill her aviary. She can even tolerate Henry’s grotesque physique, the open festering wound on his leg and his fumbling attempts at love making. Yet, she's constantly reminded of her ill-fated predecessors as she wears their gowns and jewels, sleeps in the same bed and even raises their children.

 

As Gregory portrays Kateryn, it's her religious leanings that put her in constant danger. She's a devout Reformer who subscribes to the new church that Henry created primarily to marry Anne Boleyn. However, there are many Papists in the court who want England to return to the Catholic Church, and Kateryn’s religious sentiments make her powerful enemies. Henry is starting to waver between Reform and Catholicism as his health deteriorates, and begins to fear that, in breaking from the Church, he is doomed to eternal damnation. As Henry’s mental health also declines, he sees heretics and traitors everywhere, and not even Kateryn is safe. When she discovers the King is about to have her arrested, Kateryn must swallow her pride and humiliate herself in order to avoid the executioner.

 


 
 

Stand-Off

posted by: November 5, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Stand-OffStand-Off by Andrew Smith, the sequel to the acclaimed Winger, starts off with our hero, Ryan Dean West, about to return to his prestigious (if strict) boarding school Pine Mountain Academy as the school’s first 15-year-old graduating senior. Along with the normal doubts and insecurity his relative youth to his senior classmates would bring, he feels overwhelmed by the enthusiasm of his bright-eyed 12-year-old roommate Sam Abernathy. Sam’s relentless chipperness is more oppressive than endearing, and to make matters worse, he suffers from extreme claustrophobia that could send him into a panic if conditions aren’t just perfect. Normally warm and friendly, Ryan Dean begins to push friends new and old away, refusing advice from his girlfriend, honor from his Rugby coach and friendship from Sam, who reminds him a little too much of himself three short years ago. The real crux of Ryan Dean’s pain, however, is dealing with the trauma of the previous year, the chillingly real terrors that plague him night and day that force him to accept grief, resolution and humility.

     

Andrew Smith’s first person storytelling is warm, direct and effortless. Ryan Dean comes to life in voice as well as in visuals. Sam Bosma accompanies Smith’s prose with illustrations and comics crafted to fit Ryan Dean’s voice, which takes the storytelling to a new level. A read of Winger first is a must for this excellent, fast-paced sequel. Lovers of imaginative but ultimately down-to-earth and realistic fiction of all levels will find themselves exhilarated, heart-broken and lost in these two books.


 
 

Why Not Me?

posted by: November 4, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Why Not Me?Mindy Kaling has become a well-known leading lady, writer, director, fashionista and general force to be reckoned with. Because of her show The Mindy Project, we are now on a first name basis with her. Her new collection of essays, Why Not Me?, is just like catching up with an old friend who happens to be doing all of the talking, though we don’t even mind because she is truly that charming. Her essays are hilarious, insightful and even more personal than those in her first book.

 

She offers up plenty of celebrity stories with the likes of Bradley Cooper, Reese Witherspoon and even President Barack Obama. However, she is always completely relatable. Her response to fame, and the unique situations she finds herself in because of her fame, is exactly what you or I would think if we were suddenly “a little bit famous.”

 

In this collection, Kaling addresses questions she didn’t feel prepared to tackle before, like being asked how she maintains her confidence by a young woman who had lost her own. Kaling confesses that she didn’t have an answer at the time, but now she does. Her secret is hard work — 19-hour-day kind of hard work.

 

There is an entire essay in which the author imagines her alternate life as a Latin teacher at a private high school in New York, told to us through email correspondence. It was delightful. I would read an entire book about alternate Mindy. I also hope this potential book gets turned into a movie starring Mindy.

 

For die-hard fans, it's worth it to check out both the book and the audio book because each contain extras that the other does not. The book has many great pictures, including an entire “Day in the Life” segment. However, the essays truly come to life when delivered by the author in the audio version. She has perfect comedic timing and obviously the best delivery of her own jokes.

 

Readers who enjoy this book will love her first essay collection Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), Yes Please by Amy Poehler and You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day.

 


 
 

Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit

posted by: November 3, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Food WhoreFood whore: a person willing to do anything for food.
 

In her debut novel, Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit, Jessica Tom tells the mesmerizing tale of one such food whore, Tia Monroe. An aspiring food writer, Tia believes she can ascend to the top of New York’s cutthroat food world, where being the next big thing is achieved at any cost.  
 

Tia hopes to begin her ascension by securing an internship with famed cookbook writer, Helen Lansky. But fate has a different plan. She crosses paths with Michael Saltz, the anonymous and powerful New York Times food critic who has a big secret. He has lost his sense of taste. He convinces Tia to ghostwrite his reviews and, in return, she is provided with designer clothes, access to four-star restaurants and the coveted internship with Lansky. But no one can know of their partnership. She believes this is a small price to pay to achieve her dream.  After all, she will be working in the exclusive world of four-star restaurants and celebrity chefs, making unbelievable connections. Any grad student would kill for such unprecedented access. But Tia soon realizes that real connections are difficult to make when you have a secret. Will she keep her integrity while achieving her dream? Or, like so many before her, will she become just another casualty of the New York dining scene?
 

If you like both deception and true-to-life characters, Food Whore will keep you hooked to the very end. Clearly, dining and deceit do make great fiction.
 

For a true, no-holds-barred, hilarious account of New York’s restaurant world, try Anthony Bourdain’s memoir, Kitchen Confidential.
 


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The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss

posted by: November 2, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max WirestoneThe Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss have resulted in a familiar premise in this debut novel by Max Wirestone: Girl graduates from college with crippling debt and zero job prospects. Girl’s boyfriend has left her for another woman, forcing her to mooch room and board off the kindness of a friend.

 

But then Dahlia is randomly offered a lucrative job as a private detective. All she has to do is find and recover a virtual sword stolen in a video game. She is given the suspected culprit’s name, the time he will be meeting her for dinner and the assurance that he will turn over the sword. Dahlia Moss is no seasoned PI, but this sounds like easy money.

 

Of course the job ends up being more complicated than expected, especially after the man who hired her turns up dead—impaled by a real-life replica of the stolen sword. And he still owes her $1,000! Dahlia can’t help but wonder who killed him… and why did he even hire her in the first place? Soon Dahlia finds herself investigating multiple mysteries and enduring uncomfortable encounters with homicide detectives, the dead man’s former friends and guild mates, not to mention her own ex-boyfriend.

 

Fans of The Big Bang Theory and The Guild will enjoy the MMORPG setting and the nerdy humor. A former librarian, Wirestone got the idea for the Dahlia Moss series after noticing that many of his geeky customers were also his mystery lovers. He has created a lovable, unexpected heroine in Dahlia Moss. She is funny, she is sassy, she is an amateur Veronica Mars in a Jigglypuff hat.


 
 

Witches of America

posted by: October 29, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Witches of America by Alex MarWitches of America is in some ways the antithesis to other spiritual narratives that have been popular recently, such as Unorthodox by Deborah Feldman, which focus on practitioners reinventing themselves outside of their respective religions. It is author Alex Mar’s narrative as she investigates Pagan worship in contemporary American society, first as a documentarian for her film American Mystic, which profiles different practitioners of alternative religions, and then as an initiate into the Feri, a self-described “sex cult,” struggling against her inherent skepticism and upbringing as an atheist to experience transcendence for herself.

 

While Mar has a down-to-earth attitude in the face of mysticism that many readers will relate to, she is also honest about her biases and attempts to approach the weird without judgment. In spite of the sensationalism the subject matter inherently conjures up, her exploration reveals how practicing Pagans are seeking answers to questions all spiritual people ask, including what it means to have a higher calling and what actions it takes to live a “good” life. As an investigator, Mar comes across as a sympathetic interlocutor, actively trying to immerse herself in a society that is extremely conscious of its outsider status and protective of what that status entails. As she puts it, “Groucho Marx would have understood the witches: their clubs do not necessarily want you as a member.” The results of her mining are revealed in her personal development and include several thoughtful observations regarding skepticism and faith.

Liz

Liz

 
 

Alphabet Books: Not Just for Toddlers

posted by: October 28, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Rad American Women A-Z by Kate SchatzCover art for A to Z Great Modern Artists by Andy TuohyWriter Kate Schatz and artist Miriam Klein Stahl pair up to make their wonderfully colorful and informative book Rad American Women A-Z. Each woman gets a two-page spread with a graphic illustrated portrait and a few easy-to-read paragraphs. There are a myriad of different women including actresses, artists, scientists and activists. In addition to showing a variety of careers, Schatz and Stahl feature women with different socioeconomic backgrounds, races, ages, gender identifications and disabilities. Notable features include Kate Bornstein, a transgender writer and performance artist, “who reminds us to bravely claim our true identity,” and Temple Grandin, an autistic animal science professor, “who shows us the power of a brilliant mind.” Although the text is written at a fifth-grade level, the women featured can be shared with any age group, from kindergartners to adults.

 

A to Z Great Modern Artists, drawn by Andy Tuohy and with text by Christopher Masters, is the kind of aesthetically pleasing book to have on your coffee table for when you want to get absorbed into something interesting but don’t quite feel like engaging yourself in a novel or magazine. Each featured artist has a portrait drawn by Andy Tuohy that replicates the style of that artist—Piet Mondrian’s portrait is drawn in the signature geometric style of his artwork, while Andy Warhol’s portrait is done in his famous pop-art style. In addition to Tuohy’s creative portraits, each letter of the alphabet feels like its own exhibit and includes notable works of art from the featured artists. You’ll want to move through the book slowly, like you would when walking through an art museum, in order to fully appreciate all of the nuances of Tuohy’s creative design.


 
 

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