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Incredible Story of Intrigue No Accident

Cover art for The AccidentChris Pavone’s second book The Accident seems like an unlikely mash-up at first blush, but, in fact, it is a perfect blend of two worlds that rarely crossover. One world is the rapidly collapsing world of publishing and the other is the treacherous world of international espionage. The point where they connect is a globe-spanning multimedia empire, Wolf Media, whose founder committed a horrible crime. A memoir has surfaced exposing the founder's many crimes written by an anonymous yet highly accurate source. As the manuscript winds its way through the publishing world, it goes viral in the traditional sense of the word, it spreads unchecked and brings death to everyone who reads it.

 

Pavone’s sophomore outing works for a number of reasons. You quickly see that the world of espionage and publishing are natural counterpoints. People in those fields work hand-in-hand with the powerful and influential, but they lack the wealth, resources and fame of the same. They are Cinderella at the ball, allowed to see the spectacle, but living lives much separated from it. Secondly, Wolf Media and its real life counterparts have had a huge impact on publishing and wield unprecedented influence on international affairs. Pavone tackles this idea head-on, showing Wolf Media as both the possible savior and destroyer of traditional publishing, while at the same time being manipulated by — and sometimes manipulator of — intelligence agencies.

 

Pavone, a longtime veteran of the publishing industry, provides keen insight into modern publishing, an industry that seems to be living from one quarterly balance sheet to the next. Just as interesting is his depiction of a post 9/11 U.S. intelligence apparatus that is so focused on one particular region and threat that an off-the-books intelligence operation can operate without oversight and for the benefit of corporate partners.

 

The Accident is much like the David Mamet film The Spanish Prisoner. Each time you think you know where the story is going, you will be surprised, right up to the final shocking revelations. Pavone has crafted a unique tale of intrigue, espionage and murder in our modern world where spies and secrets are far less the provenance of nations than powerful multinational corporations.

Brian

 
 

Your Underwater Adventure Awaits

Covert art for Deep Sea DisasterCover art for Lights! Camera! Hammerhead!Harry Hammer, a hammerhead shark, has created his list of the top five coolest sharks in existence. Of course, number one is the great white with their rows of pointy sharp teeth. Number two is the fast swimming blue shark. The stripy and scary tiger shark clocks in at number three, and number four is the ginormous whale shark. Finally, to round out the top five cool sharks, there's the bull shark, who can swim in rivers as well as the sea. So what could be cool about a goofy-looking hammerhead shark? That’s the question on Harry’s mind in the first book of Davy Ocean’s new series, Shark School: Deep Sea Disaster.
 

When Harry’s class goes on a field trip to a shipwreck for a group project, their sea turtle teacher has given them strict instruction to not go into the wreck because it’s too dangerous. However, Harry’s group ignores their teacher’s instructions and enters the rusty old ship anyway. Things turn bad and the students become trapped in the collapsing wreck. Can Harry use his special hammerhead sensory powers to find a way out and prove that he’s just as cool as all the other sharks in the sea?
 

In the second installment, Shark School: Lights! Camera! Hammerhead!, we follow Harry and his friends as they try to find something entertaining to do during school vacation. When the “leggy air-breathers” arrive to make a new movie, Harry hatches a plan to become famous, just like his hero Gregor the Gnasher. But Harry’s not the only shark with aspirations for stardom. Will Harry be able to nab a starring role in the film? Or will Rick Reef steal the show?
 

These fast-paced, action-filled, underwater adventures are sure to please first chapter readers. From dealing with bullies to embracing your own uniqueness, kids will be able to identify with the situations faced by Harry and his friends. As an added bonus you can enjoy some “Shark Bites,” fascinating facts about the animals that live in the ocean.

Christina

 
 

The Treasure Within

The Treasure Within

posted by:
July 9, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for All the Light We Cannot SeeSome books are beautifully written while others tell a fascinating story. And then there is Anthony Doerr’s new novel All the Light We Cannot See, which combines exquisite prose with an engrossing and layered tale of history, science and myth set in Europe during the era of World War II.

 

In August of 1944, the French coastal city of St. Malo was the location of a battle between the occupying Nazi troops and the Allied forces determined to drive out the Germans. In the city, Marie-Laure LeBlanc, a 16-year-old blind girl, is home alone, hiding under her bed when the shelling begins. Across town, German army private Walter Pfennig is stationed with his radio team in the basement of the Hotel of Bees.

 

Doerr moves his story back and forth within a 10 year time frame. Marie-Laure was living in Paris with her father, the locksmith for the vast complex of the National Museum of Natural History. The pair fled Paris as the Occupation began, possibly carrying with them a priceless diamond steeped in legend from the museum’s collection. As a boy, Werner lived in an orphanage where he repaired a radio discarded as trash. He and his little sister would tune in to French radio broadcasts about science. Gifted with an analytical mind, Werner is drafted by the Nazis, using his skills to hunt down amateur broadcasters for the Resistance. Doerr carefully unfolds each character’s narrative as they gradually converge in St. Malo.

 

The center of this story might be a peerless gem, as cursed as the Hope diamond, both precious and horrifying. It might be the realization that both good and evil — or caring and callousness — can live within one heart. All the Light We Cannot See is a finely crafted work and deserves its place on The New York Times best sellers list. Readers of World War II literary fiction might also enjoy Tan Twan Eng’s The Garden of Evening Mists, a 2012 Man Booker finalist.   

Lori

 
 

A Tragic, Beautiful Reckoning

A Tragic, Beautiful Reckoning

posted by:
July 8, 2014 - 9:38am

Cover art for The Girls from Carona del MarWe all have friends from yesteryear with whom we pine for the perfect, golden memories of whatever chapter of our lives we consider to be “the good old days.” Rufi Thorpe’s debut novel The Girls from Corona del Mar follows two best friends, Mia and Lorrie Ann, as their journeys take them from their California hometown to the far corners of the world and back again, testing their bond along the way.

 

Mia is convinced that her friend Lorrie Ann is her counterbalance in the universe. Beautiful, soft-spoken and otherwise perfect in every manner, she can do no wrong in her kindred spirit’s eyes. Lorrie Ann’s only flaw seems to be her terrible luck; despite being an elementally good person, she suffers three distinct, life-altering tragedies that leave her reeling and unsure of her purpose in life. Mia feels powerless, remorseful and guilty, as if her best friend was being punished for her own shortcomings.

 

As the two grow older, their lives become disparate; Mia marries and moves to Turkey to develop her career while Lorrie Ann is swallowed up by the world. After years of sporadic contact, Mia is shocked when her best friend turns up in Istanbul, battered and in need of help. What transpires after the two are reunited challenges the temper of their time-forged companionship.

 

The Girls from Corona del Mar is a tragic, beautiful reckoning of the worst catastrophes life can muster, and illustrates just how powerful and enduring friendship can be, despite the fragility of youth. Anyone who has lost a best friend to time or distance will sympathize as Mia and Lorrie Ann’s story progresses. Rufi Thorpe has written a wonderful debut that will be enjoyed by fans of literary fiction or women’s literature.

Tom

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A Great Summer Read

A Great Summer Read

posted by:
July 8, 2014 - 9:37am

Cover art for Landline2013 was a banner year for Rainbow Rowell, having published two major hits: the popular Fangirl and the critically lauded Eleanor and Park, which won a Michael L. Printz Honor for Excellence in Young Adult Fiction. Rowell fans can rejoice as her hotly anticipated adult novel, Landline, hits BCPL’s shelves today.

 

Georgie McCool is on the verge of a major breakthrough in her career. She and her writing partner have a huge meeting with a studio executive the day after Christmas to pitch their very own TV show. It’s everything she’s ever dreamed of, but the meeting means her family won’t be able to go to Omaha to visit her mother-in-law. Georgie’s husband, Neal, decides to take their daughters anyway, leaving Georgie alone on Christmas to contemplate their marriage, her career and how her marriage has turned into something unfamiliar and uncomfortable. She goes to her mother’s house and finds an old-fashioned rotary phone in her childhood bedroom and uses it to call Neal in Nebraska. Neal answers, but not her husband of 14 years; it’s Neal of 1998, right before he is about to propose, and suddenly Georgie wonders if she’s destined to reroute their shared history by talking him out of their marriage before it even begins.

 

In Landline, unlike Rowell’s other novels, the main relationship isn’t a burgeoning romance: It’s a marriage of 14 years. There’s too much at stake to let it falter, and the tension between Georgie and the past and present Neals will keep readers itching to skip to the last page to see how it all turns out. There is a lot to laugh about in the book as well: funny, relatable characters; a pug in labor and tons of pop culture references. Landline is a winner for a great summer read, especially if you recognize the phone on the cover as something you had in your own bedroom (or just begged your parents for when you were in junior high).

Jessica

 
 

When Fairy Tales Fracture

Cover art for Princess PinkOnce upon a time there was a little girl named Princess Pink. Yes, her first name was Princess and her last name was Pink. Princess enjoyed mud puddles, monster trucks and giant bugs. She absolutely, positively hated the color pink. One night, after her mother tucked her in bed and turned off the light, Princess noticed that her tummy was grumbling. She tiptoed to the kitchen to find a snack, but instead of finding some tasty green-bean casserole, Princess opened the refrigerator door and fell into the land of fake-believe. Accompanied by Mother Moose and a green-haired girl named Moldylocks, Princess set off on a crazy-cakes adventure in Moldylocks and the Three Beards, written and illustrated by Noah Z. Jones.

 

Moldylocks took the still hungry Princess to the weird looking house of the Three Beards. Once there, the two girls tried the three Beards’ chairs and tasted the three different bowls of chili. They also tested out all three of the Beards’ beds, finding one to be just right to jump on and play Cowboy Caveman.  Suddenly, the Three Beards returned home and were not happy to find that someone had been sitting in their chairs, eating their chili and jumping on their beds!

 

Did Moldylocks and Princess escape the three angry Beards? Or did they end up ingredients in the next batch of chili? And what exactly is a tunacorn? If your child has recently transitioned into first chapter books and likes zany, action-packed stories with unusual characters and colorful illustrations on every page, then this book is perfect.  Parents will also enjoy the reading comprehension questions on the last page that will help you discuss the wonderful world of fake-believe with your kids. This book is an excellent pick for summer reading fun!

Christina

 
 

A Doughboy's Best Friend

Cover art for Stubby the War DogCover art for Sergeant StubbyTo commemorate the centennial of the outbreak of World War I this summer, many new books have been and will continue to be released. They range from new analyses of battles, biographies of personalities of the era and wide-ranging assessments of how the ‘War to End All Wars’ set the history of the 20th and 21st century and its continuing conflicts in motion. A furry character study for young readers comes in Ann Bausum’s Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog. As the United States was at last pulled into the war in 1917, a stray, brindle-colored Boston Bull Terrier wandered onto a soldiers’ training ground at Yale University. The soldiers all took a liking to this sweet, short-tailed dog, but none more than enlisted man James Conroy.

 

Training complete (for both men and dog), the soldiers were sent to sea, and Conroy smuggled the pup onto the ship bound for France. Now considered a mascot, Stubby had been taught to stand on his rear legs and lift his right paw to salute high-ranking officers. This endeared Stubby to all he met, including women of the French resistance, who sewed him a natty uniform. The dog turned out to be a valiant and useful addition to the men in the trenches, as he aided with rat removal, alerted the men to enemies approaching and was even temporarily wounded in action while helping to discover landmines. Bausum illustrates the history of the four-legged hero with plenty of period photographs from the Conroy family collection and other ephemera of the WWI era. Her impeccable research is outlined in endnotes and an extensive bibliography. She also tells of this famous dog in Sergeant Stubby: How a Stray Dog and His Best Friend Helped Win World War I and Stole the Heart of a Nation, written for adult readers. This title covers even more of Stubby’s exploits during and after the war. Both books are published by National Geographic, and are excellent avenues into this period. They will be enjoyed by dog lovers as well as by history buffs.
 

Todd

 
 

Walter Dean Myers, 1937-2014

Cover art for MonsterCover art for Fallen AngelsWalter Dean Myers, author of more than 100 books for children and teens, passed away on July 1st at the age of 76. Myers wrote with depth and authenticity. His novels included realistic characters, and he didn’t avoid difficult topics. In his Michael L. Printz Award-winning novel Monster, Myers delves into the world of a 16-year-old boy on trial for murder. His novel Fallen Angels is about a Harlem teen who enlists in the Army and spends a year on active duty on the front lines of the Vietnam War.

 

 

Throughout his distinguished career, Myers earned many prestigious awards for his work including two Newbery Honors, three National Book Award nominations and six Coretta Scott King Awards. He was also awarded the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, as well as the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. In 2012, Myers was named the Library of Congress National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.

 

 

A lifelong champion of diversity in children’s literature, Myers passionately addressed the issue in an essay in The New York Times, writing, “Books transmit values. They explore our common humanity. What is the message when some children are not represented in those books?” The essay ended simply, “There is work to be done.” That work will be done in his memory as his legacy is carried on through his writing.

Beth

 
 

Murder Abroad

Murder Abroad

posted by:
July 3, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Present DarknessCover art for Murder at Cape Three PointsMalla Nunn and Kwei Quartey present two African mysteries that are sure to thrill the armchair traveler looking for a suspenseful police investigation.

 

Racism and police corruption during Apartheid in Johannesburg, South Africa are the subjects Nunn tackles in her novel, Present Darkness. Emmanuel Cooper is a flawed detective who rose from the mean streets of Sophiatown to enter the police force and must hide the fact that he is in an illegal relationship with a woman of color. When a European couple is found severely beaten in their home and the main suspect is a Zulu named Aaron Shabalala, the youngest son of Cooper’s friend and colleague, Cooper is cautioned strongly not to investigate. Cooper as he ignores the direct order of his supervisor in order to save the son of a man to whom he owes his life. Nunn’s exploration of this difficult time in South African history is compelling, and her thoughtful prose creates a chilling atmosphere that is sure to enthrall the reader until the novel’s heart-stopping conclusion.

 

In Murder at Cape Three Points, Quartey introduces the reader to Detective Inspector Darko Dawson, who works in Accra on the coast of Ghana. Late one night, a canoe is found drifting near an off-shore oil rig. In the canoe are the bodies of the Smith-Aidoos, an influential, highly educated couple. Darko digs deeper and uncovers corrupt real estate deals and bribery, all threatening to the local fishing trade and seeming to stem from the oil industry. With a growing list of suspects and a tenacious family member looking for results, Darko must put all of his skills to the test. Quartey has a more traditional approach to crime solving, and fans of police procedurals will enjoy this novel.

 

Both writers excel at detailed descriptions of their respective countries and will appeal to readers who love visiting an exotic locale. Readers who enjoy these selections can find earlier novels in the series from both authors. Those who like the African setting and are longing for more should try Michael Stanley and Deon Meyer.

Doug

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Ballerina with a Secret

Ballerina with a Secret

posted by:
July 3, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for PointeTheo, short for Theodora, is a talented ballerina on her way to joining a professional ballet company when her life becomes infinitely more complicated. After her best friend Donovan disappeared when they were 13, Theo struggled with an eating disorder. Now, four years later, she feels like she’s recovered – that is until the fateful day when Donovan reappears, and new, unexpected complications pop up. Brandy Colbert’s debut, Pointe, is a thrilling novel that leads readers on a twisted path as they follow Theo’s spiral out of control.

 

When Theo hears the news that Donovan has returned home and isn’t speaking, she is shocked. When she realizes she knew Donovan’s accused kidnapper, she must come to terms with this discovery and decide what to do with her information. Theo considers her options, all while going to school, preparing for ballet auditions and getting involved in a relationship with the pianist at her ballet studio.

 

Throughout Pointe, Colbert deftly deals with many heavy issues, such as race, drugs and abuse, and does so in a way that keeps readers intrigued throughout the novel’s many twists and turns. Colbert has created a complex character in Theo, one who is far from perfect, but one readers will root for. Mature teen readers looking for a dark novel with intrigue will want to check out Brandy Colbert’s Pointe.
 

Laura