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Miracleman: The Golden Age

posted by: May 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for MiraclemanAfter 30 years of legal troubles kept it from seeing print, Miracleman: The Golden Age by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham is a lost classic that is well worth the wait. For those unfamiliar, Miracleman was the first “serious” superhero, who began the “grim ‘n gritty” style of comics in the 1980’s.This was a time when writers started asking what would happen if superheroes existed in the real world. The answer was usually violent. But for a comic that came from the same era as cynical classics like Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, Neil Gaiman’s Miracleman is surprisingly optimistic.

 

The story of Miracleman is basically about a Superman knockoff who discovers that he’s actually the product of government experiments and brainwashing. He decides to break the cycle of superhero antics by abolishing all governments and setting up a global utopia over which he rules as a god. It’s a pretty shocking concept, but when Neil Gaiman took over writing the book he did something even more audacious: he took the idea of a world without crime and ran with it. Instead of focusing on Miracleman, the book suddenly became a series of vignettes exploring how average people react to finding themselves in a utopia.

 

This was Gaiman’s first comics work and so it’s surprising that it’s some of his best. The stories in this volume are both wildly imaginative and emotionally grounded. We’re introduced to various people — a father making a pilgrimage to Miracleman to ask him to save his daughter’s life, a spy learning to live in a world without espionage and even a resurrected Andy Warhol questioning existence and getting back into silk screening — each of them trying to understand what it means to be human in a world that is suddenly (more or less) perfect. Fans of Gaiman’s Sandman series will find plenty to enjoy, and even non comic book fans will discover a book that proves comics don’t have to be violent to explore adult ideas.


 
 

Miss Julia Inherits a Mess

posted by: May 24, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Miss Julia Inherits a MessEver the faithful friend and family fixer, Miss Julia is plunged into a disaster not of her own making in Miss Julia Inherits a Mess by Ann B. Ross. Julia is dismayed to learn that Mattie Freemantle, a spinster with no family, has fallen and broken her hip. As any good neighbors would, Julia and her friends gather to visit, comfort and organize. Mattie can hardly be called a close friend, but it’s the right thing to do. So you can just imagine Julia’s reaction when she receives a call from Mattie’s lawyer informing her she entrusted Julia with power of attorney, and that decisions must be made promptly. When Mattie dies, Julia learns to her horror that she is the executor of the will.

 

Mattie’s home is loaded with furniture, bric-a-brac and junk mail that will take weeks to sort. Mattie has remembered half the town in her will, from the mechanic who repaired her ancient car to the grocery boy who carried her parcels. Mattie’s promises went a lot farther than her wealth; that $840 in her bank account isn’t going to go far.

 

Realizing that the task will only fall to less capable shoulders, Julia pitches in and gets to work. Employing some local experts to assist with valuation, a possible nugget is discovered under all that dust. Things are looking up, until a young man claiming to be Mattie’s long lost nephew asks to live in her apartment and take some of her things — for sentimental value, of course.

 

Fans of lighthearted southern fiction will delight in the town’s eccentric characters and Miss Julia’s efforts to fulfill a lonely old spinster's final wishes. Fans of Fanny Flagg, Mignon Ballard and Jan Karon will find a treat in this satisfying romp.

 


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Journey to Munich

posted by: May 23, 2016 - 7:00am

Journey to MunichIn early 1938, the intrepid Maisie Dobbs returns to England and her former profession in Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspear. As Maisie walks the streets of London, she meanders through her memories. Dealing with her grief and the irresponsible actions that lead to her husband’s death, Maisie is approached by MI-5 for a treacherous mission. Leon Donat, a British subject visiting Germany to publish books, has been taken prisoner and sent to the notorious prison at Dachau. After complex negotiations, the German government has agreed to release Donat, but only if his daughter personally escorts her father home. Bearing a striking resemblance to Donat’s gravely ill daughter, as well as possessing certain valuable skills, MI-5 considers Maisie to be Donat’s only chance at escape.

 

Donat is no ordinary book publisher. He loves to tinker, and with his pen and paper he creates amazing inventions. Donat’s engineering skills and creative energy could mean the difference between winning and losing a war. While war has not yet been declared, it is obvious that the great nations of Europe are marching down an inexorable path. Germany has become a powder keg of simmering tensions, traitorous neighbors and underground defiance. Into this maelstrom, Maisie must convince Nazi officials she is Donat’s daughter and spirit him safely away before the Gestapo discovers his value.

 

Winspear has created a tale of emotional depth and moral conflict as Maisie struggles to reconcile her own experiences with what she has been called upon to perform. For while she is trying to free Donat, she has also been asked to assist the one person she holds accountable for her husband’s death.

 

Jacqueline Winspear has won the Agatha, Alex and Macavity awards for best first novel. If you like your mysteries with lots of historical atmosphere, a touch of spiritualism and a lot of spunk, Journey to Munich will surely deliver.


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Half-Earth

posted by: May 19, 2016 - 7:00am

Half-EarthEdward O. Wilson has spent many decades explaining science to the multitudes. His passion for natural history rings true in all of his books. From his very first book The Ants (his specialty is myrmecology — the study of ants) to The Social Conquest of Earth, up through his most recent, Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life, Wilson spends his words to ignite in every human passion for the Earth that equals his own.

 

This 86-year-old myrmecologist starts off huge: Humans need to set aside fully half the Earth for nature, no exceptions. Why do they need to do this? Because only something that startling in scope can offset the magnitude of what people have been doing to the planet. His ultimately hopeful conclusion inspires the reader to action. This world can get better. The Earth can heal. But Wilson believes that the inhabitants of the Earth cannot sit by and dream of a better place — they have to make it. All life is interdependent, and in this Anthropocene Era, the era of humanity, humans are best-equipped to begin the healing process.

 

Believe him or not, there is absolutely no arguing with the man’s passion or his commitment to making the world safe for generations to come. Anyone interested in climatology, biology, or any of the life sciences, and those who enjoyed The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us by Diane Ackerman or Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit by Alison Hawthorne Deming should read this book right away.


 
 

The Girl from Everywhere

posted by: May 18, 2016 - 7:00am

The Girl from EverywhereTime-traveling pirates? Count me in. Heidi Heilig has offered up just such delicious fare with The Girl from Everywhere, the first installment in her new teen series.

 

Nix, whose father is the captain of The Temptation, has grown up on the ship traveling to any far-flung place in time they happen to have a map for, including magical and mythological locales. The eccentric crew members are the closest thing she has to family. But, one place always beckons her father back — the place where he lost Nix’s mother. If he could get back, perhaps he could save her.

 

Time travel has rules, however. The crew can never use the same map twice, and the map must be an original reflection of the place in time it was created. While the captain would do anything to get his hands on a usable map of 1868 Honolulu, it is hard to find one that will actually work.

 

To acquire a potentially usable map, the crew will have to pull more than one major heist. Since piracy is never as simple as it sounds, they must also deal with unforeseen obstacles along the way.

 

Nix’s complex relationship with her father is especially compelling, though there are also hints of romance. Nix’s best friend aboard the ship may have deeper feelings, and she also meets an enigmatic stranger who will test her loyalties to the ship and the crew.

 

Heilig, a native Hawaiian, ties in a surprising amount of actual history concerning the island at this pivotal time in its history, and her descriptions of the place, the people and the food are magical.

 

Readers who enjoy this book should check out Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell, The Love That Split the World by Emily Henry and Passenger by Alexandra Bracken.


 
 

Saving Alex

posted by: May 17, 2016 - 7:00am

Saving AlexWhen you pick up a copy of Saving Alex: When I Was 15 I Told My Mormon Parents I Was Gay, and That’s When My Nightmare Began, you do so already knowing that author Alexandra Cooper grew up Mormon, that she came out to her parents at a young age and that the results were disastrous. What you might not realize is how profound, life-changing, community-changing and uplifting the journey Alex took after her “nightmare” was, and what a powerful effect this young woman has had over one of the most complicated and tightly knit communities in our country.

 

One of the final strongholds that has continued to uphold discrimination against gay Americans, and gay youth in particular, has been the establishment of the Church of Latter Day Saints. According to Mormon doctrine, which includes but goes beyond the Old Testament, gay individuals cannot belong to sacred family units, or the Church, or reach Heaven. Certain belief in this is what frightened Alex’s parents to hysterics when, at 15, rebellious and strong-willed, she told them that she was dating another girl, and that she was a lesbian. They had taken action to discipline their “problem” child before, but this time their choices were devastating. They sent Alex away from their home in California to live with a family in St. George, Utah —a family that promised to help “cure” Alex of the sin of homosexuality. Alex found herself isolated from her friends, unable to use any methods of communication outside the strangers’ house, and, when she acted out in desperation for freedom, beaten, enslaved and made to carry heavy burdens and stare at a wall for weeks at a time without rest.

 

Alex tells her story with such love and tenderness that it’s mortifying to realize what cruelties she endured. Despite her trauma, Alex speaks with clear-headed empathy for her family as well as the culture she was raised in. She expresses an understanding for the fear and anxiety that led her abusers to treat her the way they did, even if she now knows they were wrong for trying to change her. Alex’s case made very recent history in Utah in 2011 by overturning legislation that enforced a parent’s right to try to change or reform a child’s sexuality against their will. Saving Alex is a hard book to read, but is ultimately a triumph, ending as reality often does — broken but hopeful, with some things lost and some things gained. Alex did not lose her life, family or rights, as so many before her did. She hopes to gain the same for the youth of the future.


 
 

The Past

posted by: May 16, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The PastTessa Hadley’s new novel The Past is a beautifully written story capturing the complex relationships of families — both with each other and with their own past — as the characters find themselves tangled in patterns of behavior they don’t know how to break.

 

The story begins with a summer holiday. One by one, the grown siblings arrive at Kington House with children, groceries and even an unexpected guest. Harriet has arrived first, but immediately slipped off to the woods for a walk. When Alice arrives without her key, she must sit on the stoop and wait. That would have been fine if she hadn’t inexplicably invited her ex-boyfriend’s son Kashim, a chronically bored college student. As they peer into the house like strangers, Alice grows embarrassed of her typical forgetfulness. Fran and her children show up with their car packed full of groceries and let the others in. The sisters immediately begin pouring drinks and speculating about their brother Roland’s newest wife, Pilar, whom they haven’t yet met. And, as easily as that, they all slip into the family roles they know so well: the distant one, the flighty one, the responsible one.

 

Kington House is the vicarage where their grandparents lived and their mother grew up. The pleasantly dilapidated house has no cell phone service, cable TV or even a decent store, but it is full of memories. Every chipped tea cup and desk drawer holds a story, a part of their family’s past. On this vacation, the siblings must decide whether they will continue to hang on to the house, which needs a great deal of repair, or let go.

 

This lovely isolation creates a perfect setting for us to be enveloped in this chaotic family. We become one of them, feeling empathy for them even when they frustrate us beyond belief.

 

There is a grace to Hadley’s writing as she slips from one character’s innermost thoughts to the next. Even without an action-packed plot, this work is hard to put down. This family, their struggles and secrets, are so well written they become like people we have known, and they will linger with readers.

 

Readers who enjoy The Past will be interested in Hadley's previous books. It is easy to see why she is being called one of our greatest contemporary authors.


 
 

The Summer Before the War

posted by: May 12, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Summer Before the WarThe 100th anniversary of the War to End All Wars has created a proliferation of popular fiction set during World War I. Standing head and shoulders above the crowd is Helen Simonson’s The Summer Before the War.

 

Agatha Kent has a well-ordered life as the wife of a British diplomat. She has travelled the world, and resides contentedly in the coastal Sussex town of Rye. Agatha is confident that her husband will succeed in his efforts to quell the quarrel in the Balkans and looks forward to a visit from her two nephews. Hugh is a brilliant young surgeon just finishing his studies. Daniel, the apple of his aunt’s eye, is a burgeoning poet of great promise. The only potential tempest on the horizon is Agatha’s arrangement to hire a female Latin instructor for the local school.

 

Beatrice Nash has lost her beloved father and must find a way to support herself. Her inheritance has been tied up in a trust controlled by relatives who do not believe a single woman should be without the protection of a man. Fleeing their plans to marry her off, she has accepted the position of Latin instructor in an insular English village. The daughter of a respected writer, Beatrice is well-traveled and highly educated. Her new role, as well as her independence of spirit, presents a challenge to the rigid hierarchy of the town. As the summer deepens, everyone must face a far greater threat to their way of life; the German invasion of Belgium brings reality as well as refugees.

 

Simonson’s debut novel Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand is an international bestseller. The Summer Before the War is an insightful, witty, haunting portrait that will surely captivate its readers.


 
 

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