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Lies of Midwives

Lies of Midwives

posted by:
March 27, 2015 - 7:00am

The Secrets of Midwives by Sally HepworthSally Hepworth’s new novel The Secrets of Midwives is realistic fiction set in present day Rhode Island with periodic glimpses of 1950s rural England. This novel is a heartfelt look at the relationships of mothers and daughters while at the same time giving a general glimpse at the profession of midwifery. While not Sally Hepworth’s debut novel, it is her first to be published in the U.S.

 

This charming novel looks at three generations of women who have all chosen to pursue the career of midwife, each pursuing the profession in a different way. Floss, the matriarch of the family, is a bit late in years to practice so she has taken to teaching. Gloss, her daughter, prefers to provide midwife services for home births while Gloss’s daughter Neva practices at a birthing center housed in a hospital.

 

Midwifery isn’t the only thing these women share. All three carry the heavy weight of a life altering-secret. When Neva learns she is pregnant, she pretends that there is no father. Her mother Grace is challenged by the board of nursing and her mystery could cost her license. Then there is Floss, who carries the heaviest burden of them all…because what she is hiding affects them all.

 

Hepworth skillfully uncovers each woman’s secret little by little, culminating in an emotional final few chapters. If the novel leaves you longing for something similar, Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah is another read about uncovering secrets and the relationships of mother and daughter.

Randalee

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Short Stories Sweet and Tart

Short Stories Sweet and Tart

posted by:
March 26, 2015 - 7:00am

This House Is Not for Sale by E. C. OsonduStone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret AtwoodShort stories are usually read in a single sitting. Pick up either of these new collections, This House Is Not for Sale by E. C. Osondu or Stone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret Atwood, and find that sitting stretching out leads from one story to the next.

 

This House Is Not for Sale is set in a nameless African village. The main character of each story lives in Grandpa’s grand family house and so falls under this powerful, and perhaps corrupt, domain. Some of the stories feature ordinary problems, like Abule and his serially cheating wife or Uncle Currency’s workplace embezzlement. Other problems are more closely tied to African folklore, such as the soul-stealer who prevents Tata from carrying pregnancies to term. Conflicts are illuminated by anonymous villagers’ gossipy commentary reminiscent of a fragmented Greek chorus, and when necessary, the godfather-like Grandpa steps in to deliver a final judgment. Esondu, winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, captures both the joy and pain of everyday life in these thoughtful vignettes.

 

Bitingly irreverent wit, an unsentimental use of aging protagonists and unpredictable plots mark the wonderful Stone Mattress. The first three stories form a sort of trilogy. In “Alphinland,” widowed Constance, author of a cult classic fantasy series, is guided through a blizzard by the blow-by-blow verbal instructions issued by her dead husband. At the same time, she is also remembering her first love, the pompous and ever-randy poet Gavin, who betrayed Constance with another woman. “Revenent” features Gavin, now an impotent curmudgeon married to his third, much younger wife who is heavily invested in preserving Gavin’s legacy, if not necessarily Gavin himself. Finally, in “Dark Lady,” all the players — including the “other woman” — meet again. Other stories revisit the friends from “The Robber Bride,” find a predatory widow meeting up with her rapist prom date of 50 years ago or track a one-trick pony author determined to snuff out old friends living off his royalties. Atwood is a master wordsmith and excels when revealing her characters’ internal dialogue. The only disappointment here is that by their nature, these stories are short so the pleasure of reading them ends too quickly.

Lori

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Secret Society Intrigue

Secret Society Intrigue

posted by:
March 25, 2015 - 7:00am

The Conspiracy of Us by Maggie HallThe first in a planned trilogy, The Conspiracy of Us by Maggie Hall is the start to a fast-paced thriller series that readers won’t be able to put down. When the book begins, Avery West is a fairly typical teenager, with the exception of the all-too-frequent moves she and her mom make for her mom’s job. However, when Jack Bishop shows up at her high school and asks her to prom, her whole life changes in a way she never would have expected.

 

What should be a happy moment in her school year is turned upside down when Jack reveals that her absent father's family is incredibly powerful and a part of a secret society, the Circle, that dates back to the time of Alexander the Great. Avery learns that the Circle controls many of the world’s governing bodies and has extreme power in other areas as well, which she witnesses first hand. She’s whisked away to Paris, and the Circle shuts down Prada so she can shop by herself for an afternoon. As Avery learns more about her family background and the secret society they’re a part of, she is drawn even deeper into the Circle’s lore. Meanwhile, Jack begins to realize Avery’s importance to the Circle, leading the two on a whirlwind, worldwide adventure.

 

The Conspiracy of Us is filled with mystery, suspense and romance. Maggie Hall has created a story that will delight readers looking for a new thriller. Check out Hall’s Pinterest account for a fun board of inspiration for the fashion and travel locations for the series.

Laura

 
 

Shape Shift and Trick the Past Again

Seconds by Bryan Lee O'MalleyKatie’s having a rough time in Bryan Lee O’Malley’s Seconds. Her restaurant just keeps getting farther and farther behind, her ex-boyfriend has started showing up at her job and, in one phenomenally disastrous evening, one of her waitresses gets burned — and it’s her fault. She gets lucky, though. In a small box in the back of her dresser, she finds a mushroom and a notepad that allow her to rewrite a day that went wrong. Things improve so much that she ignores the rule about only making one wish. That’s when things start to get weird.

 

O’Malley’s Scott Pilgrim series was one of the biggest comics of the past decade, a rampaging tour-de-force that fused relationships, video game mechanics, a Toronto setting and indie music. Seconds is a quieter story, more focused on the tail end of one’s 20s. Reality may warp, but this is a story about homes, families and making a place in the world, not just falling into one. When Katie uses a mushroom to undo all the time apart from her boyfriend, she winds up in a relationship that doesn’t work because she hasn’t been present for it. Homes need to be built, not cheated into.

 

When O’Malley created Scott Pilgrim, he published in black and white, creating art that went for dynamism over nuance. Seconds is a full-color print in soft reds and pinks, navy blues and ochres. Even though Seconds is set during a Canadian winter, this is a warm book. Scott Pilgrim made fighting a metaphor for personal history. Seconds toys more with security and running away, using that soft palette to shade in the nuances of what it means to both screw up a home and grow up enough to fix your mistakes.

Matt

 
 

Crimson Coils

Crimson Coils

posted by:
March 23, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for You Feel So MortalWhen composed by a gifted writer, creative nonfiction can be a magical vessel capable of alchemizing the mundane into the enthralling. Lifelong-Chicagoan Peggy Shinner is one such sorceress; in her collection You Feel So Mortal, she reflects on the elemental aesthetics and feelings of the human body, touching on the ideas of awkward feet, poor posture, proper fit and even plastic surgery.

 

In “The Fitting(s),” Shinner recounts a harrowing trip to an upscale department store to purchase new bras with the aid of a professional fitter. Her tale is laced with memories of shopping with her mother, and her own ponderings on the implications of choosing the alluring over the practical as a sort of gratuity to the fitter’s expertise. Shinner chronicles her experiences training as an advanced martial artist in “The Knife,” an essay about the myriad reciprocities between our bodies and the tools we use. “Elective” is a soul-bearing debate on the merits of plastic surgery: Does the empowerment of perceived beauty outweigh the emotional strain born from the defilement of one’s natural state?

 

Blended with sentimental storytelling in a lighter literary voice, Shinner’s factual anecdotes help characterize her worldly observations. She treasures her rare vantage and shares her assembled insights in nine accessible essays brimming with equal parts nostalgia and profundity. You Feel So Mortal is perfect for literary essay enthusiasts, for nonfiction lovers looking for something endearing and sentimental, or for readers interested in Jewish or lesbian perspective.

Tom

 
 

Julia & Julia

Julia & Julia

posted by:
March 20, 2015 - 7:07am

Cover art for The Devil Takes a BrideCover art for The Secrets of Sir Richard KenworthyJulia London and Julia Quinn are bestselling, award-winning novelists with devoted followings. So readers have hit the jackpot with delightful new novels from each that are sure to please those looking for engaging characters and compelling stories rich with romance.

 

Grace Cabot has run out of ideas to save her family from disgrace in London’s The Devil Takes a Bride. Marriage to a wealthy man is her only option and she sets out to trap one of her favorite flirts. But her plan goes amiss when she accidently seduces the wrong man — the not-to-be-trifled-with Jeffrey, Earl of Merryton. The sizzling duo at the heart of this second title in the Cabot Stepsisters series will captivate readers. Jeffrey is rational, a control freak and a planner whose plans do not include a wife. Grace is scattered, spontaneous and impulsive. But these opposites are attracted to one another as they enter into a marriage in name only, fully intending on burying their secrets forever. Fans will relish this Regency with flawed and realistic characters who share an emotional journey of discovery on their way to happily ever after.

 

Keeping family secrets is at the root of Quinn’s The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy. In picking a wife, Sir Richard can’t be choosy, as he only has one month to tie the knot in order to hide his teenage sister’s soon-to-be teenage mom status from society. When he spots Iris Smythe-Smith at her family’s annual musicale, he is instantly taken with her unassuming nature and quiet charm. Iris is not used to being the center of anyone’s attention, so when Richard demands an introduction, she is stunned, and when he starts relentlessly courting her, she is pleasantly surprised. His quick proposal heightens her suspicions, although she agrees to be his wife. In the end, Iris must face her fears and decide whether to follow her heart or her head in this perfect, passionate finale to Quinn’s Smythe-Smith quartet series.

 

Maureen

 
 

Bring on Spring

Bring on Spring

posted by:
March 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Thing About SpringCover art for Sun Above and Blooms BelowAs the days get longer and the nights get shorter, we start to see evidence of the changing seasons which tells us spring is coming. On March 20, we will welcome the first official day of spring. What better way to shake off the winter doldrums than to dive into some children’s picture books about the changing of the season!

 

In Daniel Kirk’s new picture book The Thing About Spring, Mouse, Bird and Bear are excited to see the buds on the trees and the little tender shoots coming up from the ground. Their friend Rabbit does not share their enthusiasm. Rabbit loves everything about winter. He can find his friends by following their tracks in the snow. If spring comes and the snow melts, he won’t be able to make snow bunnies or snow forts. In order to keep some of his favorite season around, Rabbit scoops some snow into a bucket in order to save it. Will Rabbit’s friends be able to convince him that spring is going to be great? Digitally enhanced pen and ink illustrations help to bring the story to life as we watch the season change through pictures.

 

A school field trip to the country is just the thing to chase away cabin fever. It's also a great way to explore the opposites found on every page in Sun Above and Blooms Below: A Springtime of Opposites by Felicia Sanzari Chernesky with boldly colorful, collage-style illustrations by Susan Swan. Whether it’s open and closed, up and down or many and few, children will delight in seeing the seasonal changes that bring about new life on the farm.

Christina

 
 

Brother Against Brother

Cover art for The Man Who Would Not Be WashingtonCover art for Marching HomeOne of the great paradoxes of history is Robert E. Lee’s decision to fight for the Confederacy rather than defend the Union. Jonathan Horn explores the great battle Lee fought within himself in The Man Who Would Not Be Washington.

 

Robert E. Lee was the son of a renowned Revolutionary General, the son-in-law of Washington’s adopted child and the keeper of the flame of Washington’s legacy. He graduated second in his class at West Point, fought for his country during the Mexican-American War, and was considered the natural choice to command the Union Army. Despite a lifetime defending the Constitution against all enemies, he could not bear arms against his neighbors. Horn’s extensive research follows Lee through his personal and professional life, illuminating the deep ties of family, affection and history that bound the Washington and Lee families. It is this one, fateful decision that has shaped our perception of Washington and created the American story.

 

Our nation’s story is not simply about the generals, but also the private soldiers. In Marching Home: The Union Veterans and Their Unending Civil War, Brian Jordan shatters the legend of the constantly faithful, overly sentimental soldier who attends reunions and speaks fondly of brothers-in-arms. Rather, the soldiers were tormented by wounds and memories. A new fight began after the war — the fight for dignity, fair compensation and recognition of their accomplishments. Determined to put the war behind them, civilians were unprepared for the return of shell-shocked veterans and unwilling to deal with their needs. Using pension records, diaries, letters and regimental histories, Brian Matthew Jordan has brought into stark relief the needs of veterans and the vast gulf between the home front and the battlefront.

 

Two great reads for Civil War devotees — from one Civil War nut to another!

Leanne

 
 

Between the Covers with Paul Gude

Cover art for A Surprise for Giraffe and ElephantPaul Gude’s picture book A Surprise for Giraffe and Elephant highlights the close friendship between a silent, thoughtful giraffe and his constant companion, an enthusiastic, loquacious elephant. The second outing for this dissimilar pair, Surprise features three funny, knowing stories that manage to distill the essence of what true friendship entails. In the first, Giraffe struggles to find the right time to play his alpine horn. The second depicts Giraffe working through the night to honor Elephant’s wish for a toboggan. The final story finds Elephant diligently preparing to throw her friend the perfect surprise party. Gude’s simple yet expressive line drawings and bright, zingy color palette are immediately appealing to young readers.

 

BTC: Congratulations on the publication of the new Giraffe and Elephant book. I understand that this duo has been around for quite some time. Tell us their origin story and a little bit about their history. And why a talking elephant?
Paul Gude: My standard line when people ask me why Giraffe doesn't talk is to say, "You're less surprised about the talking elephant?" So, you've beaten me at my own game. My hat is off to you. Giraffe came first. I would draw little pictures for my friend with little captions. I drew one that said, "Here is a giraffe eating some leaves!" She made some comment like, "I like giraffes almost as much as I like elephants!" I drew another picture with a giraffe and elephant eating ice cream cones together with a caption like, "You don't have to choose! Giraffes and elephants are friends!"

 

I had this crazy idea of just drawing the giraffe and elephant doing all sorts of things together. So I kept at it. The very next thing they did was steal a van. Then Elephant shot Giraffe out of a cannon. They invented new words. Every day it was something new. That was in 2000. In 2001, my friend KMO at C-realm.com gave me space to publish them. This was before Tumblr and its ilk, so having a place to put an archive of comics was kind of a big deal. I just kept doing them over the years, until I amassed almost a thousand.

 

Picture of Paul Gude.I flirted with publishing a collection of them in the mid-2000s, but nothing came of it. Later on, a friend of the editor who had been trying to get someone to publish the book asked her if she knew anyone who might need representation. She put him in touch with me and that's how I got my agent.

 

We sent out the collection, and the feedback was, "We like the characters, but can they be involved in a story?" At one time I would have taken this to mean, "We don't like your book," but I had matured enough by then to know it meant, "We like the characters, but can they be involved in a story?" My agent was smart enough to make sure I understood that this wasn't a brush-off, and set me to work telling the stories. That became When Elephant Met Giraffe, which my agent sold to Disney/Hyperion. That's kind of how they solidified into the personalities that they are today. Granted, they're drawn a bit better now as well. Years of practice can help in that regard.

 

BTC: What medium do you use to create your art?
PG: While I like pen and ink just fine, Giraffe and Elephant were born as crudely drawn characters using a mouse and Photoshop. They've been mostly digital from then on, although I do experiment from time to time. The artwork for both When Elephant Met Giraffe and A Surprise for Giraffe and Elephant was done on an iPad 2 with a program called iDraw. It was actually the cheapest option and I was short on funds.

 

BTC: When I read the Giraffe and Elephant books, I was reminded of both James Marshall’s George and Martha and of Mo Willems’ Elephant and Piggie. Did they come to mind as you were writing the books? Which children’s authors or illustrators inspire you?
PG: I love Mo Willems. I was lucky enough to interview him back when that was part of my day job. He's very friendly and super funny. It's worth noting that he and I are both published by Disney/Hyperion and he was there first. So, I'm hoping the fact that we both have characters who are elephants will stop being a sticking point for some folks eventually. Your question was very polite, but others have been quick to criticize as though my elephant is derivative. I think it's a little unfair. First of all, his elephant's name is Gerald. Elephant's Gerald. Say it out loud, and you get what kind of a genius that man is. Second, anyone who reads Mo's books and mine knows that his are mostly dialog-driven, whereas mine are more narrative. In short, they are much more like George and Martha. More of what I was reading as a kid, I suppose. Maurice Sendak was a big one for me. Also, I loved Shel Silverstein. Other favorites from my childhood include the Ann Trompert and John Wallner book Little Fox Goes to the End of the World. So many others I know I'm forgetting. In these modern times I'm a big fan of Zoom and Re-Zoom by Istvan Banyai and Jon Klassen's hat books. Again, I know there must be more. I'll have to check my daughter's bookshelf.

 

Cover art for When Elephant Met GiraffeBTC: One of the things I loved about both When Elephant Met Giraffe and A Surprise for Giraffe and Elephant is that they’re picture books adults also enjoy — they’re droll, and not preachy or sappy. How does being a parent affect your work?
PG: The funny thing about the publishing world is that it moves so very slow. When I was writing When Elephant Met Giraffe it was a little too advanced for her. By the time it was published, she had already outgrown it. She's 9 now, way outside of the target demographic. Still, she's the one looking over my shoulder when I'm working. So, I suppose in a way that's a big reason why I throw in humor that everyone can enjoy. I want my kid to still think I'm funny. In a more pragmatic sense, the parents are the ones who are going to have to read the book over and over again, so I try to make it as painless as possible. Very few words. Funny pictures. You can't go wrong. Well, you can go wrong, I suppose. It depends on who you ask.

 

BTC: One "quirk" of Surprise mentioned by a major review publication is the fact that Giraffe uses an acetylene torch to build a toboggan. Were you surprised by this bit of criticism?
PG: Oh, boy. Yes. This was brought up as the book was in production, and I was like, "No, no, they can be wood or metal. I know. I had a metal one." Apparently I am one of the few people who remembers these types of toboggans that had metal scoops on the front, though. If you look for pictures of them online, the curved part at the front is almost always wood. I kept searching and searching until I found a picture of one. I thought I was going crazy. They exist, though. I've seen them. I've linked to one on my blog. It's odd to me that people leap to the idea that Giraffe is erroneously using a torch on a wooden object rather than the thing he's constructing being partially made out of metal. I assume they simply don't have the design skills of a giraffe.

 

BTC: I recently followed Giraffe on Twitter. I’ve enjoyed having a look into his psyche. What prompted him to get on social media? What kind of device does he use?
PG: It's always been in the back of my mind that Giraffe has a very rich inner life. When Elephant isn't distracting him from his studies, he's pursing art and science through his own self-taught methods. As an offshoot of this, I had an idea that Giraffe has built himself this amazing contraption that allows him to communicate on Twitter via Morse code. There's a pressure plate he uses to tap out words, and then this complex series of switches turns it into text. Where does he get his Wi-Fi service though? Giraffe keeps secrets even from me.

Paula G.

 
 

A Perilous Reunion

A Perilous Reunion

posted by:
March 16, 2015 - 8:00am

Her by Harriet LaneIt seems innocent enough in the beginning, the budding friendship between Nina and Emma in Harriet Lane's new psychological thriller Her. Nina is the well-heeled 40-something artist who outwardly seems to have it all. The pregnant Emma, on the other hand, has an understandably chaotic and messy life with a demanding toddler in tow. So when Nina takes a soothing interest in the harried Emma, the young mother is smitten and even a little flattered.

 

Lane wants readers to get nervous about this one-sided friendship that seems to take hold when the sophisticated Nina spots Emma on a London street one day. She recognizes the younger woman, but Emma doesn't recognize her. And the pursuit is on. What happens next is difficult to figure, as Nina deftly worms her way into the nucleus of Emma's life. When the complicated Nina lures Emma's small son away from his mother in a park, she instigates a parent's worst nightmare, but why does she do it? For sure, Nina's subtle and sinister cruelties hint of the Hitchcockian drama to unfold.

 

British author Lane, whose first novel was Alys, Always, seems keen on manipulative protagonists. In Her, she uses restraint in shifting the story from the alternating perspectives of the two women. With a simmering plot and plenty of questions to answer, the ending will sneak up on you and accomplish what a psychological thriller is meant to do: stay with you. Readers of Gone Girl and also-new The Girl on the Train will want to sit down with this tautly written gem that will also hit the spot.

Cynthia

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